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Theranos whistle-blower testifies she was alarmed by company’s blood tests.

  • September 15, 2021

“The C.E.O. is not responsible for every communication that happens within a company,” said Lance Wade, a lawyer representing Ms. Holmes.

John Bostic, a prosecutor and an assistant U.S. attorney, argued that documents showing Theranos’s internal issues were relevant to the case, regardless of whether Ms. Holmes’s name was on them.

Mr. Wade countered that Ms. Cheung had been an entry-level employee and hardly interacted with Ms. Holmes.

“To the best of our knowledge, the interview you just heard was the longest conversation she ever had with our client,” he said.

Through it all, Ms. Holmes sat quietly in a gray blazer and black dress, watching the proceedings from behind a medical mask.

Ms. Cheung’s 2015 letter to the Centers for Medicare Medicaid Services outlining problems with Theranos’s testing triggered a surprise inspection by the agency that led the company to close its labs. Tyler Shultz, another young employee in Theranos’s lab, also shared details about the lab problems with The Wall Street Journal, which published exposés of the company. Mr. Shultz is also listed as a potential witness in the trial. (An earlier version of this item misspelled his name as Schultz.)

Since her role in Theranos’s demise, Ms. Cheung has become an advocate for ethics in technology. She has delivered a TED Talk about speaking truth to power and helped found Ethics in Entrepreneurship, a nonprofit that provides ethics training and workshops to start-up founders, workers and investors.

Article source: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/14/technology/elizabeth-holmes-trial-theranos.html

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